Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Student Faces Three Years In Prison For Modifying Xbox 360


In the first case of its kind, a man from Southern California is set to go on trial Tuesday on criminal charges of circumventing digital rights management (DRM) by modifying Microsoft's Xbox 360 console.


Twenty-eight-year old Matthew Crippen faces two counts of violating the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) and could face a maximum of three years in prison if convicted.

The Cal State Fullerton liberal arts student is accused of installing chips on Xbox 360 consoles that allowed people to run pirated DVDs and other unofficial content.
In a potentially devastating decision, a federal judge ruled last week that Crippen could not claim "fair use" as a defense for modifying a gaming console.

Crippen's attorneys had hoped to claim that installing a mod chip in a gaming console was no different than "jailbreaking" an iPhone, since both devices share many of the same basic functions.

Read More HERE
UPDATE: Looks like a smart judge did the right thing. Check link to read more.

25 comments:

  1. DMCA is the kind of legislation you get when your politicians are vile, corrupt scum. (Thank you President Clinton but they're all the same.)

    Having said that, if he was modding for money he was asking for it.

    (And they'll have to pry my XBMC from my cold, dead fingers.)

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  2. Thats bullshit!!!! I dont believe this!

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  3. lol. That must suck but it doesn't surprise me.

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  4. Wow's that's a hefty sentence.

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  5. What a load of BS. I wonder if I can get arrested for taking the X-Clamps off of mine to fix the Red Ring of Death. Improving upon their retarded and flawed design is no different than adding things, whether it be fans to improve cooling functions, or a modchip to play LEGAL backups of the games one has already purchased.

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  6. are u fuckin kidding me..jesus

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  7. It's ridiculous how hard they knock people for doing things like this. They try to set 'examples' by making the penalties so harsh, but all in all, it just makes the government/RIAA whoever's responsible look like trash.

    I can understand right and wrong, but if you look at some people caught downloading mp3s, and charged millions for it, ridiculous.

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  8. That is so stupid, how can someone face jail time for tampering with their own private property? As long as he had permission to tamper with other peoples xbox I see no crime.

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  9. Hey, the article this points to sez the trial was suspended
    "Judge suspends Xbox modder's trial, admonishes prosecution"

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  10. this sets a huge legal precedent! people were advertising their modding services on craigslist lol, they'll probably stop now

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  11. That's like when that guy got busted in Glasgow for cracking the code on how to copy DVDs. My how times haven't really changed.

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  12. Three years for that? Wow, talk about unfair!

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  13. Seems a bit excessive given the result is very similar to jailbreaking.

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  14. I don't think he's going to do any actual prison time but i think he'll get fined and maybe do some community service hours

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  15. They can arrest as many people as they want...people will still do it though. Personally I don't, mainly because I have no idea how..but If I had the skills to get free games I'd take the chance.

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  16. That is a harsh sentence if it is carried out. The guy didn't hurt anyone did he, so I feel that a fine and/or community service would be a more appropriate punishment.

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  17. Couldn't they put a more dangerous person in jail instead?

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  18. :( what? jailbreaking is legal, so why cant you mod an xbox?

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  19. He's been acquitted. Thankfully the charges have been dropped.

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  20. case dismissed! today! woo woo, and modding continues, baby!

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